Eggnog from the Finch & Pea

I had a partner, another academic, once upon a time, who on the day before Xmas break would go around the department with a cartoon of eggnog and a bottle of rum, and fill up everybody’s coffee cup (with their permission).

One of my current favorites from the Finch and the Pea (uh, my highlight) – I am particularly fond of the defense of raw egg in the 2nd recipe.

The origins of eggnog are much debated, but one thing is certain…there has always been and should always be alcohol in it. I am including two different recipes for eggnog here. The first is for the eggnog that we are all probably most used to. This is essentially a custard* known as crème anglaise. As well as making a delicious holiday drink, crème anglaise is also a common sauce in desserts and, when frozen, becomes ice cream. The thing that separates eggnog from melted vanilla ice cream…wait for it…bourbon and nutmeg. This is what gives eggnog that distinct eggnog flavor. In your store-bought versions, it is not real bourbon and nutmeg, but flavorings that have been added to imitate the flavor. I say, if it is going to taste like bourbon, it might as well have some bourbon in it. Whipped cream is folded into the eggnog at the end to create lightness and body.

traditional-egg-nog-recipe-insert2

The second recipe is for a much more traditional version of eggnog and actually includes an aging process. The aging is not completely necessary, but does let the flavors blend and develop as well as thickening the mixture. We won’t worry about the fact that the egg in this version is not cooked or that we end up folding in raw egg white or that the recipe tells you to let dairy produces sit and age for up to six months. Why? Because there is so much alcohol in this sucker that you couldn’t grow bacteria in it if you wanted to. I have made this before and aged it for a full six months and, yes, it was absolutely worth it.

traditional-egg-nog-recipe-insert

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s