Pubmed adds commenting

Pubmed has added commenting. It is called PubMed Commons. I think this has incredible potential. But its the kind of thing that will work only if people participate. I suspect penetration (as they say in the genetics world) will vary with subdiscipline. I’ve joined. Everyone should (it costs nothing, and doesn’t hurt too much).

Here is their blurb:

PubMed Commons is a system that enables researchers to share their opinions about scientific publications. Researchers can comment on any publication indexed by PubMed, and read the comments of others. PubMed Commons is a forum for open and constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues. It will thrive with high quality interchange from the scientific community. PubMed Commons is currently in a closed pilot testing phase, which means that only invited participants can add and view comments in PubMed.

You need to join. Here is how to join:

How to Join PubMed Commons

PubMed Commons is a system that enables researchers to share their opinions about scientific publications. Researchers can comment on any publication indexed by PubMed, and read the comments of others.

For the current pilot testing phase there is a limited facility for joining that may work for you. Several organizations have provided lists of approved author e-mail addresses. If you are included on the list, you can request an invitation to join. Additional options for joining will be provided in future releases.

In order to complete the process you will also need to have a My NCBI account. If you don’t already have one, register for a free account.

See if you are on the list

Currently, author information has been compiled from:

  • NIH extramural programs
  • NIH intramural programs
  • Wellcome Trust

If you have multiple e-mail addresses, enter the one that you normally use for publications and grant applications.

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One thought on “Pubmed adds commenting

  1. This is interesting. My first thoughts went to the civil discourse (sarcasm) that on-line comment sections tend to foster, but then I started thinking that if it is real names then people will likely be more civil. Although, I’m sure we can all think of scientific meetings where presentation question time has been less than civil. Will have to wait to see what happens.

    I understand the need to limit registration while in a pilot phase, but this does mean that as a postdoc with first author pubs but no NIH grant I have to beg for an invite to see if anyone is commenting on my work. I’m not exactly cool with that.

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